Wynter Gordon, Closets
Wynter Gordon

On Nick Cave's new album, the song "Higgs Boson Blues" has Miley Cyrus floating in a pool as a symbol of the spiritual crisis that has seeped into every crevice of our "culture"(aka Money and Success At All Costs).  But with every low there is a high, and the antidote to the Miley prototype is Wynter Gordon. Our newest Music X Style muse gave up a record deal and the money that accompanies oversexed pop stars because she didn't want to sing about "nothing." In demure floral dresses and native ponchos, Wynter is in her power singing about pain and suffering, all of which she let come out without premeditation on her first independent album, Human Condition: Doleo.  Raised by pastors on welfare, Wynter sang gospel on street corners when she wasn't stepping on crack vials while walking to school. Wynter, though, is a proud survivor of the "hood," and is committed to letting others know that they are not alone when it comes to life's low moments.

Determined to use her voice as a gift to help others, salvation has come for Wynter by walking away from the 10,000 people who screamed when she batted her eyelashes so that she could pour her heart out in songs, like the mesmerizing "Stimela." Its beats are taken from the Zulu she learned from a teacher she had her senior year at LaGuardia, her personal hero, Hugh Masekela, an activist and a jazz musician during the apartheid in South Africa. While waiting on line to audition for the elite high school of artists, Wynter was made fun for her odd brown loafers and goose down jacket, but it's Wynter's vocal chords that gave her the last laugh.  She was accepted after two bars of Pocahontas's "Colors of the Wind." Hope lives when the talented thrive over the bogus, and Wynter will continue to prove that heartfelt is the new legitimate. As Wynter points out, "Strength isn't just about overcoming your own circumstances, it's about helping other people."

xo Elisa & Lily

Video Edited by Maximiliano Gaston Longo.
Music: "Levitate" & "Lucky Ones" by Wynter Gordon.

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